So, You Actually Believe Hillary Won the “Popular Vote?”

Riddle me this:

Why does the United States have 3.5 million more registered voters than it has living adult citizens who are eligible to vote?

That’s impossible after all the Democrats say there is no reason for Voter ID laws or purging the voter rolls. They claim that anyone who wants to ensure only people who are supposed to vote are allowed to vote are trying to suppress voter turnout. And in a way they are correct, we want to make sure that none of those 3.5 million extra voters get to cast ballots, that would be voter fraud.

The Election Integrity Project of Judicial Watch — a Washington-based legal-watchdog group — analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2011–2015 American Community Survey and last month’s [July] statistics from the federal Election Assistance Commission. The latter included figures provided by 38 states. According to Judicial Watch, eleven states gave the EAC insufficient or questionable information. Pennsylvania’s legitimate numbers place it just below the over-registration threshold.

At National Review, contributing editor Deroy Murdock must have had an urge to create excel charts.

He took a look at Judicial Watch’s state-by-state results yielded 462 counties where the registration rate exceeded 100 percent. There were 3,551,760 more people registered to vote than adult U.S. citizens who inhabit these counties. Almost half of them are in one state (can you guess?).

To put that in perspective the 3.5+ million is larger than twenty of the nation’s fifty states, or if it were a city, it would be the third largest city in America behind NY and LA. Mr, Murdock calls them “ghost-voters.”

These 462 counties (18.5 percent of the 2,500 studied) exhibit this ghost-voter problem. These range from 101 percent registration in Delaware’s New Castle County to New Mexico’s Harding County, where there are 62 percent more registered voters than living, breathing adult citizens — or a 162 percent registration rate.

Washington’s Clark County is worrisome, given its 154 percent registration rate. This includes 166,811 ghost voters. Georgia’s Fulton County seems less nettlesome at 108 percent registration, except for the number of Greater Atlantans, 53,172, who compose that figure.

But California’s San Diego County earns the enchilada grande [I would guess the pun is intended]. Its 138 percent registration translates into 810,966 ghost voters. Los Angeles County’s 112 percent rate equals 707,475 over-registrations. Beyond the official data that it received, Judicial Watch reports that LA County employees “informed us that the total number of registered voters now stands at a number that is a whopping 144 percent of the total number of resident citizens of voting age.”

All told, California is a veritable haunted house, teeming with 1,736,556 ghost voters. Judicial Watch last week wrote Democratic secretary of state Alex Padilla and authorities in eleven Golden State counties and documented how their election records are in shambles.

Murdock does point out that there is an over registration in many of the battleground states where the Electoral College votes can be decided minimal margins. Take a look at the over registration numbers in these background states:

  • Colorado: 159,373
  •  Florida: 100,782
  • Iowa: 31,077
  • Michigan: 225,235
  • New Hampshire: 8,211
  •  North Carolina: 189,721
  • ‐Virginia: 89,979

President Donald J. Trump’s supporters might be intrigued to learn that Hillary Clinton’s margins of victory in Colorado (136,386) and New Hampshire (2,736) were lower than the numbers of ghost voters in those states.

Via: LidBlog

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